Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka: Contemporary Themes

Convenors: Dr Ali Jan, Professor Matthew McCartney, Professor Nayanika Mathur, Professor Kate Sullivan de Estrada and others.

This lecture course will give students an introduction to important topics in non-India, contemporary South Asia. Lectures may be framed around a particular country but will be explicitly comparative in perspective. A uniting theme will be to think about what contribution Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Nepal make to our understanding of the social sciences. How Bangladesh and Sri Lanka for example have managed to rapidly improve the life chances, employment prospects and health conditions of women whilst Pakistan (and India) have failed to do so. The course will also be valuable in pushing students to think about South Asia beyond the regional hegemon, India. The course will cut across disciplines so encourage students to think in inter-disciplinary terms. The course will provide an intellectual parallel to the option ‘India as a Rising Power’ which seeks to study contemporary India through the lens of social science disciplines of economics and international relations.

 

Take a look at...

Adeney, Katherine (2012) ‘A Step towards Inclusive Federalism in Pakistan? The politics of the 18th Amendment’ Publius: The Journal of Federalism, Vol 42, No 4: 439-565

Pokharel, Bhojraj (2012) Elections: A Nepali perspective in Einsiendel, Sebastian von Malone, David & Pradhan, Suman Nepal in Transition: From People’s War to Fragile Peace. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Ahmed, Samina. "Pakistan's Nuclear Weapons Program: Turning Points and Nuclear Choices." International Security 23.4 (1999): 178-204.

Destradi, Sandra. “India and the Civil War in Sri Lanka: On the Failures of Regional Conflict Management in South Asia”, GIGA Working Papers, No. 154 (December 2010).

Shafqat Hussain, 2015. Remoteness and Modernity: Transformation and Continuity in Northern Pakistan. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Sen, K and S.Kar (2014), ‘Boom and Bust? A Political Economy Reading of India’s Growth Experience, 1993-2013’, IEG Working Paper No 342, New Delhi.

Kabeer, N and S.Mahmud (2004), ‘Globalisation, Gender and Poverty: Bangladesh Women Workers in Export and Local Markets’, Journal of International Development, 16, p93-109.

Kelegama, S (2009),’ Ready-made Garment Exports from Sri Lanka’, Journal of Contemporary Asia, 39:4, p579-596.

 

The image above shows Matthew McCartney outside a bookshop in Darjeeling.