Impact Update July 2015 to March 2016

IMPACT DIARY July 2015- March 2016:

RESOURCES, GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS, TECHNOLOGY AND WORK IN PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: RICE IN INDIA    

See the earlier Impact Diary for impact activity for October 2011-June 2015.

INTRODUCTION

This is a pilot project (RES-167-25-MTRUYG0; ES/1033768/1)

funded by ESRC-DFID under their Poverty Alleviation stream

http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/funding-opportunities/international-funding/esrc-dfid/.

It has been devoted to developing new methods measuring, fusing and analysing trade-offs between environmental, social and economic parameters for parts of an economy that are ‘informal’: out of direct policy control and usually very poorly measured.

The substantive case study is of a series of production-distribution systems in the Indian rice economy.

Cross cutting themes include the politics of labour gains and of innovation in the informal economy and the informalisation of policy.

Practical policy implications were tested in a consultative  multi-criteria application.

Definition of impact in our proposal

– short term – on learning (through feedback/dissemination workshops; website; correspondence and networking; conference presentations; publications)

– longer term – on new applications and collaborations (through interactive collaboration; networking and workshops; successful new proposals and research initiatives).

Our jointly agreed philosophy of impact

 –  to expose the project to outside feedback and engagement  with three user groups from start (policy (P);  food governance/ rice/ innovation (R); advocacy, activist, research and education (AE); while ensuring that results are not presented prematurely).

 –  to talk to politicians and not only to policy-makers.

 –  to expose wide audiences to the method including research minded journalists.

 –  to have a direct public impact through the Multi Criteria Mapping experiment.

 –  to nurture and develop individual capacities for possible future applications.

Measurement of impact

– short term and long term: public engagement/learning opportunities and

– long term : further applications and further developments

There are ten aspects to our achieved impact activity:

  1. Activity throughout the life of the project (four kinds of activity);
  2. Major international conference;
  3. Teaching ourselves with others (four kinds);
  4. Impact through HE teaching and learning;
  5. Impact with civil society;
  6. Longer term follow-up;
  7. Conference presentations;
  8. Seminars and special lectures;
  9. Discussions;
  10. Publications.

1. ACTIVITY THROUGHOUT THE LIFE OF THE PROJECT – AND AFTERWARDS

1.1.EXPERT NETWORK

Network completed in mid 2015 by the Institute of Human Development in New Delhi.

Dissemination took the form of nested abstracts: 100 words -> 500 words -> link to entire paper/report in site of publication.

Presence on Facebook: Techjobs Low Carbon Future https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009708165772

1.2.ENGAGEMENT WITH JOURNALISTS  AND MEDIA

2015-16: M Raj Shekhar of Scroll.in (on informality);  

Krishna Chaitanya of Indian Express (on informality);

Darryl D’Monte (on pollution).

1.3. ENGAGEMENT WITH POLITICIANS

2015-16: none

1.4.WEBSITE

updated continually as appropriate

2. Conference June 2013

completed

3.TEACHING OURSELVES WITH OTHERS

3.1.LEARNING WORKSHOPS

 – 14-16 March 2016, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan: a two-day multidisciplinary learning workshop on Informality  -  at least 15 participants (teaching and research faculty, graduate and undergraduate students).

 – (planned and forthcoming) May 2016. Bringing ecology into sustainable nutrition – how to link develop a conceptual model to link the local environment and healthy food. Funding won from British Ecological Society. At least 15 participants.

 – (planned and forthcoming) June 2016. Making policy from complex data. Funding from OICSD for learning workshop bringing together policy makers and academics. At least 15 participants.

 

3.2. LEARNING BY DOING

no further activity

3.3. HELPING OTHERS TO LEARN THROUGH FEEDBACK-DISSEMINATION WORKSHOPS

no further activity

3.4. HELPING OTHERS TO LEARN THROUGH SHORT COURSE/TRAINING WORKSHOPS

no further activity

4. IMPACT THROUGH H.E. TEACHING

2015-16: Prof Aseem Prakash, Dean of Public Policy, has mainstreamed policy informality from his field research in this project into his masters’ curriculum in the Tata Institute of Social Science, Hyderabad campus.

2015-16: Dr Alfred Gathorne-Hardy, Research Director of the Oxford-India Centre for Sustainable Development, provides  an 8 week option course titled Sustainable Nutrition for the Masters in Public Policy at Oxford University’s Blavatnik School of Government, based in part on this project.

Late 2015 semester: Prof Barbara Harriss-White offered a 5 x 2 hour module on informality in the economy for Jawaharlal Nehru University’s new MSc in Labour Studies – 30 graduate students.

5. IMPACT WITH CIVIL SOCIETY

WIEGO (anchored in Harvard but operating worldwide) (the role of the informal economy in a green transition)

6. LONGER TERM FOLLOW-UP

Prof Aseem Prakash has won field research funding from the Indian Council of Social Science Research for a project on religion in informal business and its implications for (informalised) policy.

Likewise colleagues from the Centre for the Informal Sector and Labour Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi have won ICSSR field research grants for research on social identity and informal business in UP (Profs A. Kumar and S. Pai).

Soumanas Koulagi intends to apply the methods pioneered in the project reporting here to textiles technology in doctoral research at Edinburgh University.

Prof Barbara Harriss-White has been approached by the editor of Current Sociology Monographs (OUP) to write/compile a book on India’s informal capitalism.

The focus on gaseous waste in this project has led to focus on informality in the handling of liquid and solid waste in India - with LSE EU-ESRC funds. http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/inequalityandpoverty/ Though resulting directly from the research project reported here, the work on liquid and solid waste is now funded as a separate project.

The work on innovation in the informal economy (BH-W) is being developed in an application in China organised at the North Western Agriculture and Forests University, Xi’An, by Prof Z. Guo.

 

7. CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

Gathorne-Hardy 2015, British Ecological Society conference 2015. Socio-environmental trade-offs of Indian rice - a multidisciplinary analysis. Conference presentation.

Harriss-White: 28-29th January 2016 M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation, conference honouring Prof Venkatesh Athreya PROVISIONING CHENNAI : LABOUR IN THE RICE SUPPLY  SYSTEM

 

8. SEMINARS AND SPECIAL LECTURES on the project

Gathorne-Hardy A. : Thursday 28th January 2016. SCR/MCR Symposium, Somerville College. Should I eat rice? (Oxford India Centre for Sustainable Development)

Thursday 28 January 2016,  12:00pm – 14:00pm.The Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR), Coventry. : Is rice sustainable?

Thursday 25 February 2016,  12:00pm – 14:00pm. Imperial College, London. : Agriculture and Development

9. OTHER DISCUSSIONS OF THE PROJECT

Conseil National de Developpement et de Solidarite International, Paris, France, college international ;  WIEGO  (Marty Chen, Jim Bird), USA-worldwide; IIED, (Emily Benson) London - global; Climate Outreach, (Tany Alexander), UK;   Green Growth Knowledge Platform, (Ben Simmons) Geneva - worldwide

10. PUBLICATIONS

published

Harriss-White B. 2015, ‘"Local Capitalism" and the Development of the Rice Economy, 1973–2010’. pp 98-130 in (ed) B Harriss-White Middle India and Urban-Rural Development’ New Delhi, Springer

Gathorne-Hardy A., D. Narasimha Reddy, Motkuri Venkatanarayana and B Harriss-White Venkatanarayana Motkuri, 2016, ‘System of Rice Intensification reduces environmental impacts but at the expense of social sustainability - a multidisciplinary analysis in India’ Agricultural Systems  vol 143,pp 159-168 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.agsy.2015.12.012.

in production

Harriss-White, B. A Gathorne-Hardy and G Rodrigo, ‘Towards a lower carbon agriculture: an experiment in expert and situated knowledge.’

Harriss-White B. with Gautam Mody, M. Mani and M. Sukumar, ‘Provisioning Chennai: Labour in the Rice Supply System’,  in (ed) A. Narayamoorthy Rural India after the Reforms (pub tbc)

being revised after submission

Gathorne-Hardy A. , D Narasimha Reddy, M Venkatanarayana and B Harriss-White,   ‘The environmental, economic and social impacts of organic rice compared to conventional rice in South India’ Ecological Economics

accepted with corrections

Gathorne-Hardy, A and Harriss-White, B. Pulling in the right direction - the carbon, economic and labour implications of tractors vs bullocks, and manure vs urea. Ambio

Harriss-White B. ‘Rethinking Institutions: innovation and institutional change in India’s Informal Economy’,  Modern Asian Studies (BHW

accepted

B Harriss-White:forthcoming,   ‘Science-Policy Interfaces in an Era of Global Commodification’  chapter for ‘(eds) C.Raj Kumar, Shiv Visvanathan, R. Sudarshan and Y.S.R.Murthy The Future of Indian Universities: Comparative and International Perspectives, New Delhi, OUP  (BHW)

forthcoming   ‘Innovation in the Informal Economy of Mofussil India’  in (eds) L Mitchell et al India as a Pioneer of Innovation: Constraints & Opportunities, New Delhi, OUP  (BHW)

forthcoming ‘Innovation in India’s Informal Economy’ in (ed) Rohit Madan Entrepreneurship in the Peri-urban Global South. (pub tbc)

forthcoming Innovation in the Context of Climate Change: Learning from India’s Informal Economy, ch 11, in (ed) Manoj Roy, S Cawood and M Hordrijk Urban Poverty and Climate Change: Life in the slums of Asia, Africa and Latin America (pub tbc)

forthcoming,  ‘Filieres Vivrieres, commercial capital and the question of ‘petty production’ in South India’, in ed Lerche et al, Volume honouring Henry Bernstein