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Past Events

Modern South Asian Studies Seminar: Violence, Rents and Investment: Explaining Growth Divergence in South Asia

Tuesday, 30 January, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:30
The Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum

Why have growth rates have dramatically diverged between India and Pakistan since the 1990s, when their economic and political institutions have increasingly converged?

Adnan A. Naseemullah (KCL)

Modern South Asian Studies Seminar: The Rohingya Exodus: Orchestrated Violence and Strategies of Survival

Tuesday, 23 January, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:30
The Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum

The Rohingyas violently expelled by Myanmar are not recognized as international refugees by Bangladesh. Despite lacking citizenship and the right to work, they have sought to survive through covert employment in labour markets and clientelist relations that provide protection for a price.

Shapan Adnan

Panel discussion: Gandhi's Inspiration

Wednesday, 17 January, 2018 -
17:00 to 18:30
Pavilion Room, St Antony's College

This event marks the UK-India Year of Culture, which will be celebrated in the Oxford Town Hall on 24 January with the award-winning Indian play, Yugpurush: Mahatma's Mahatma, on the relationship between Mahatma Gandhi and his mentor, Shrimad Rajchandra. 

Professor Ruth Harris
Shrimati Kajal Sheth
Professor Sir Richard Sorabji
Dr Faisal Devji (Chair)

Acting President's Seminar: What counts as evidence in the Social Sciences?

Tuesday, 16 January, 2018 -
17:30 to 18:30
The Haldane Room, Wolfson College

Social scientists study phenomena in which people play a fundamental role: the economy, law, the internet, Brexit, and so on. People can generally do whatever they like, and so their behaviour is not governed by rules in the same way as the phenomena studied by physicists and chemists.

Mark Casson (University of Reading)
Marc Ventresca (Said Business School)