Associates

Associates of the CSASP are scholars in and out of Oxford who work actively with local members of the Contemporary South Asian Studies Programme and who in turn have access to Oxford libraries.

Shapan Adnan was educated at the Universities of Cambridge and Sussex. He has served on the teaching faculty of the National University of Singapore and the Universities of Dhaka and Chittagong, and has twice held visiting research positions at the University of Oxford. His research activities are broadly in the fields of political economy and political sociology, much of it based on ethnographic fieldwork. Shapan Adnan has published on topics including agrarian structure and capitalist development; domination and resistance among the peasantry; alienation of lands of the peasantry and indigenous peoples;  causes of ethnic conflict; determinants of fertility and migration; socio-economic and environmental impacts of development interventions; and critiques of flood control and water management.

Email:amsa127@gmail.com

Owen Bennett-Jones is a journalist who has written widely on Pakistan and violent jihadism.  His book, Pakistan: Eye of the Storm published by Yale University Press, is in its third edition. He has been a presenter of many programmes on the BBC World Service as well as a resident foreign correspondent in Bucharest, Geneva, Islamabad, Hanoi and Beirut. He writes for a Pakistani newspaper The News, the Bureau of Investigative Journalism and the London Review of Books.

Cyril Fouillet teaches economics and development studies at the ESSCA Business School in Angers, France, where he is head of the economic section and of a MA in Social and Solidarity-based Economy. As a research fellow at the French Institute of Pondicherry, he spent three years in India conducting his fieldwork on economic, spatial, and political dimensions of microfinance. He completed his Ph.D. in 2009 at the Université Libre de Bruxelles. He was a post-doctoral research fellow in development studies at the University of Oxford for two years (2009-2011). He also worked for the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (Rural Finance Group) and the Financial Sector Deepening Kenya (FSD-K). His latest contribution is an edited special issue on Microfinance Studies with J. Copestake, B. Harriss-White and M. Hudon (Oxford Development Studies, 2013).

Email cyril.fouillet@area.ox.ac.uk

Judith Heyer is an Emeritus Fellow of Somerville College and an Honorary Associate of Queen Elizabeth House. Her current research interests centre on the relationship between rural and urban, and agricultural and industrial, development in South India. She has been exploring this relationship through a longstanding study of villages in the Coimbatore region of Tamil Nadu. Coimbatore is a particularly interesting place in which to study the relationship as it is the site of a dynamic process of rural industrialisation, centred currently on Tiruppur. One of the themes on which Judith has been focusing particularly is the interaction of caste and class in the rural industrialisation process. She has also been looking at the role played by gender. Another particular interest of hers is the role that the state has been playing, both in the neo-liberal and in the pre-neo-liberal era. Judith uses a political economy approach in her work.

Email: judith.heyer@some.ox.ac.uk

Craig Jeffrey taught geography at Oxford University, where he is Fellow at St. John’s College until 2015. He is now the CEO and Director of the Australia India Institute. He has conducted academic research on youth, politics, and education in India since 1996. He is author of three recent books: Timepass: Youth, Class, and the Politics of Waiting in India (Stanford University Press  2010), Degrees Without Freedom: Education, Masculinities and Unemployment in North India (Stanford University Press 2008, with Patricia Jeffery and Roger Jeffery), and Telling Young Lives: Portraits in Global Youth (Temple University Press 2008, with Jane Dyson). He has a new book coming out next year (with Stuart Corbridge and John Harriss), titled India Today: Economy, Society. Politics. See www.aii.unimelb.edu.au/about-us/our-staff-our-board/craig-jeffrey 

Karin Kapadia is a social anthropologist and research associate at the Contemporary South Asian Studies Programme, School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, University of Oxford. Kapadia has published widely in the area of caste and gender studies. Her publications include the monograph Siva and Her Sisters: Gender, Caste and Class in Rural South India (Westview Press, 1995) and the edited book The Violence of Development: The Politics of Identity, Gender and Social Inequalities in India (Zed Press, 2002). She is also the co-editor of Rural Labour Relations in India (Frank Cass, 1999) with TJ Byres and Jens Lerche and The Worlds of Indian Industrial Labour (Sage, 1999) with Jonathan Parry and Jan Breman. Her recent publications include ‘Liberalisation and Transformations in India’s Informal Economy: Female Breadwinners in Working-Class Households in Chennai’, in The Comparative Political Economy of Development: Africa and Asia (Routledge, 2010) edited by Barbara Harriss-White and Judith Heyer, and ‘Caste and Class in Gendered Religion: Dalit Women in Chennai’s Slums’, in Women, Gender and Everyday Social Transformation in India (Anthem, 2014) edited by Kenneth Bo Nielsen and Anne Waldrop. Her most recent book is Dalit Women: Vanguard of an Alternative Politics in India (Routledge, 2017) co-edited with S. Anandhi.

Email: karin.kapadia@area.ox.ac.uk

Lucia Michelutti has taught on the MSc in Contemporary India, Oxford, since 2009. Before coming to Oxford she held posts at Department of Anthropology and the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics. Her main interests are in the intersection between political anthropology and the anthropology of religion. She is interested in the ethnographic study of democracy, questions of identity (caste and race), the production and perpetuation of inequalities, ‘lived’ concepts and practices of illegality, issues of corruption, security and violence as well as secularism, and religion. She has carried out fieldwork in North India (Uttar Pradesh) since 1998 and has worked in Venezuela and on South Asia in comparative context since 2006.

Email: lucia.michelutti@area.ox.ac.uk

Mallika Shakya is an economic anthropologist with a PhD from LSE and I recently took up Wolfson Research Fellowship at University of Oxford under which I will be developing research collaboration with Professor Keith Hart’s Human Economy project in University of Pretoria. This project investigates the industrial clusters on Nepal-India border towns involving the leading business ethnic group from South Asia – the Marwaris. It is an extension from my doctoral dissertation, which examined the role of cultural capital in Nepal’s industrialization process and the way its industrial structures are embedded within broader social and political hierarchies.  My research focused on two key issues that overshadowed the modern readymade garment industry in Nepal – the international trade politics following WTO and the local ethnopolitics following rise of Nepali Maoists. In 2004, I joined the International Trade department of the World Bank where I founded and led an Export Competitiveness Thematic Group (EC-TG) that brought on board leading economic sociologists, business scholars and macroeconomists to jointly work an interdisciplinary framework for industrial development. My handbook on export competitiveness has now been applied in several of the World Bank country operations in Asia, Africa and Latin America. I have advised governments in Asia and Africa on their policies for readymade garment industry. I was the Chief Moderator of Liberal Democracy Nepal forum (LDN) based in the Nepal Study Centre of University of New Mexico (NSC/UNM).

Email mallika.shakya@area.ox.ac.uk

Raphael Susewind is a political anthropologist of urban India; in his research and teaching, he explores Muslim belonging, the ambivalence of the sacred and electoral politics. Raphael holds postgraduate degrees in political science and area studies (the latter from this very program, where he was part of our second batch of students) and a PhD in sociology / social anthropology. His publications include a monograph, "Being Muslim and working for peace: ambivalence and ambiguity in Gujarat" (Sage 2013), two special issues and articles in the Journal of South Asian Development (on corruption and real estate), Field Methods (on a new method of inferring demographic data from the social connotations of names) and EPW (on Muslim vote banks), among others. He also blogs about his research and academic life at http://www.raphael-susewind.de.

Email raphael.susewind@area.ox.ac.uk